Total Logistics 2017

Available to download today

About the 2017 Total Logistics report

Ti’s new report, Total Logistics 2017, offers a concise, easy to understand view of the industry.

For the first time, Ti has sized the total logistics market and segmented the industry by logistics market from top to bottom, as well as forecasted growth to 2020. This report examines each logistics market, assessing the market’s current structure and dynamics, as well as the impact of economic pressures, new technologies, changes in consumer demands and increasing supply chain risks on that market. The report also explains how each market fits into the overall picture of the logistics industry.

The Total Logistics 2017 Report is available to download today.

 

This report contains

  • Concise insight into the factors shaping the global logistics market
  • Comprehensive profiles of logistics behind different vertical sectors
  • Analysis of evolving role of the warehouse in the supply chain
  • Insight into the supply chain technologies supporting logistics operations
  • Market size and forecast data for the total logistics market.

This report contains

  • Concise insight into the factors shaping the global logistics market
  • Comprehensive profiles of logistics behind different vertical sectors
  • Analysis of evolving role of the warehouse in the supply chain
  • Insight into the supply chain technologies supporting logistics operations
  • Market size and forecast data for the total logistics market.

Exclusive highlights on risks in global supply chains

  • Traditional integrated manufacturing results in high levels of internal risk due to high levels of capital outlay and inventory holding.
  • Extended supply chains are more vulnerable to external threats, but on the other hand, such networks have also dispersed risks to a number of markets by reducing centralization.
  • Another factor that impacts significantly on the extent of disruption is the location of the event within the supply chain. The further upstream it occurs, the longer the disruption to supply.
  • The characteristics of some supply chains make them more vulnerable to supply chain threats than others.

Exclusive highlights on the structure of the logistics industry

  • The global logistics industry has come about as a result of a confluence of demand-side and supply-side trends
  • World trade has been very volatile over the past decade, with underlying development being driven – until very recently – by strong growth of export and import traffic from China and related economies.
  • The world’s economy is moving from globalisation to regionalisation of supply chains. This involves a transformation from East–West and West–East flows to complex networks of developed and emerging markets.
  • Distribution strategies have been largely influenced by the trade-off between the cost of moving goods to market and the cost of holding inventories.

1.0 What is shaping the global logistics markets

  • How has the industry evolved?

2.0 An industry in transformation: Consolidation

  • Which strategies are having the most impact on the structure of the market?

3.0 Logistics market development by geography

  • How do logistics markets differ between regions and countries?

4.0 The emergence of logistics clusters

  • Where should distribution centres be located?

5.0 – 11.0 Logistics market insight

  • What are the trends and defining features of the freight forwarding, contract logistics, road freight, express, air cargo, shipping and rail & intermodal markets?

12.0 Total logistics market size and forecast

  • How big is the total logistics market and where do different markets sit within it?

13.0 Supply chain technologies

  • How are different supply chain technologies shaping the market?

14.0 Supply chain dynamics of vertical sectors

  • What are the supply chain dynamics of the automotive, spare parts, pharmaceutical, consumer and high tech sectors?

15.0 Risks in global supply chains

  • What are supply chain risks and how do you prepare for them?

16.0 The e-commerce logistics phenomenon

  • What has the impact of e-retailing been on logistics?

17.0 Supply chain innovation and disruption

  • Why is the supply chain ripe for disruption?

18.0 Ethical and sustainable supply chain strategies

  • Which environmental and legislative factors do businesses need to be aware of when developing supply chain strategies

An industry in transformation: Consolidation

This chapter will familiarize the reader with:

  • How the logistics industry has undergone a transformation in terms of the major logistics service providers which have come to dominate the market
  • The different dynamics in each logistics segment that have caused these changes
  • The major deals that have been transacted
  • The range of corporate development strategies that logistics companies have employed to meet the changing needs of their customers

Logistics market development by geography

This chapter will familiarize the reader with:

  • The factors that influence the characteristics of local and regional logistics markets
  • How individual markets have developed exploring the specific logistics market conditions in some of the largest countries
  • The impact that government regulation has had upon the development of the logistics industry
  • How markets in even neighbouring countries can differ dramatically due to the local political, economic, social or geographic variables that exist.

The emergence of logistics clusters

This chapter will familiarize the reader with:

  • The reasons behind distribution centre location
  • How transport infrastructure plays an important role in this decision
  • The functions that different types of distribution centres fulfil in the supply chain
  • Why non-transport related issues, such as rental costs and availability of labour, also play an important role
  • The key locations of distribution centres in Europe, North America and China.

Freight forwarding

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A definition and analysis of the freight forwarding industry by sector
  • An understanding of the shipper decision-making process in terms of modal choice
  • Insight into the levels of hyper-fragmentation evident in the freight forwarding market
  • An understanding of the reasons behind the consolidation that has occurred in the industry through mergers and acquisitions
  • The micro-economics that drive freight forwarding companies’ revenues and profitability

Contract logistics

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A description of how the contract logistics industry has developed as a response to higher levels of out-sourcing by retailers and manufacturers
  • An understanding of the tendering process and the types of relationship that exist between logistics service provider and customer
  • Insight into the strategic goals of logistics companies, attempting to develop higher value services and deeper customer relationships forged on intellectual capital rather than transport assets
  • An examination of how collaboration between supply chain partners at a vertical and horizontal level can bring about economic and environmental benefits.

European road freight

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A segmentation of the European road freight sector, in terms of service provision, type of goods moved and asset ownership
  • An analysis of the business models employed and their respective strengths and weaknesses
  • The link between road freight output and economic growth
  • The cost structure of a typical road haulage company
  • An analysis of the links between the cost of oil, profitability and company failure
  • A definition of cabotage and its impact on the European market.

Express parcels

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A history of the global express parcels industry
  • Market definitions and an analysis of the industry’s structure by individual segment
  • An examination of the leading companies in the market and their respective business models
  • A breakdown of the sector’s cost structures and the drivers of its revenues and profitability
  • Case studies of DHL’s failed entry into the US domestic market and the acquisition of TNT.

Air cargo

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • An explanation of the importance of air cargo to international supply chains and the global economy
  • A brief history of the air cargo industry from its origins
  • A description of the various roles fulfilled by players in the sector and their importance
  • An identification of the leading air cargo operators
  • The importance of integrators and the disruptive impact on the air cargo sector.

Shipping

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A history of the container shipping sector and its development
  • An analysis of the micro-economics of the industry and the decisions affecting capacity and their impact on shipping rates
  • An analysis of the industry’s structure, identifying the various players involved and their functions
  • A discussion of the cooperative and competitive relationship between freight forwarders and shipping lines
  • Analysis of the changing character of trade lanes as a result of economic development in emerging markets.

European rail and intermodal

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • An explanation of the importance of the European rail and intermodal sector in terms of environmental policy
  • Its strengths and weaknesses compared with road freight haulage
  • A definition of the industry and analysis of its various segments and market sectors
  • Insight into the importance of the sector to automotive manufacturers.

Supply chain technologies

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • Explanation of the various types of supply chain management software and the differences between planning and execution systems
  • A detailed overview of transport (international and domestic), warehouse and trade management systems and how they interrelate
  • An overview of the changing nature of supply chain technologies due to the development of cloud-based systems
  • An examination of freight exchanges, control towers and the latest developments in the sector, driven by the needs of e-commerce operations.

Supply chain dynamics of vertical sectors

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A detailed description of the automotive, pharmaceutical, consumer goods and high-tech supply chain sectors
  • Analysis of the main demand-side trends that have influenced the development of the associated logistics sectors
  • An analysis of the relationships that have been developed between manufacturers and logistics service providers
  • Insight into the innovations that logistics companies have developed to meet changing customer needs
  • Identification of key industry sector trends and developments that will have further impact on logistics companies’ corporate development strategies.

Risks in Global Supply Chains

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • An explanation of the changing balance between external and internal supply chain risks and how this has changed over the past decades
  • A categorization of threats into those emanating from environmental, geopolitical, technological and economic sources
  • An analysis and comparison of the resilience of vertical sector supply chains
  • Case studies of some of the most important events to have impacted upon supply chains and their implications
  • Insight into best practice and how supply chains can be made more resilient to external threats.

The e-commerce logistics phenomenon

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A description of e-commerce and the impact of e-retailing upon the logistics sector
  • An analysis of logistics segments related to e-commerce and how they have developed to meet the evolving needs of customers and parcel recipients
  • Innovations in alternative delivery locations such as lockers, click and collect and parcels shop networks
  • An overview of the growth of two of the world’s fastest-growing e-retailers, Amazon and Alibaba.

Supply chain innovation and disruption

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A characterization of the disruption process that has the potential to transform the global supply chain and logistics industry
  • A description of the major macro, ‘top-down’ and endogenous ‘bottom-up’ trends that are creating an environment for innovation
  • An assessment of the inefficiencies in the logistics industry that make the sector so ripe for disruption
  • An examination of some of the major developments, such as the ‘Internet of Things’, ‘autonomous vehicles’ and ‘3D printing’ as well as an assessment of their likely impact upon the logistics industry

Ethical and sustainable supply chain strategies

This chapter will provide the reader with:

  • A review of best practice employed in the supply chain sector, combining approaches that optimize profits whilst minimizing environmental and societal impact
  • An examination of the impact of the logistics industry on the environment, looking at modes such as road, air, sea and rail
  • An analysis of governmental response to environmental impact of logistics and the policies that have been introduced to mitigate climate change
  • A review of the ethical dimensions of supply chains, looking at how some management concepts have resulted in practices detrimental to workers and the environment, particularly in the fashion and consumer electronics sectors

Professor John Manners-Bell BA (Hons) MSc AKC FCILT

Prof John Manners-Bell is Chief Executive of Ti, Honorary Visiting Professor at the London Metropolitan University’s Guildhall Faculty of Business and Law and an adviser to the World Economic Forum. He has over 25 years’ experience working in and analysing the global logistics sector. John started his working life as an operations manager of a logistics company based in the UK. Prior to establishing Ti in 2002, he worked as an analyst in consultancies specialising in international trade, transport and logistics. He also spent a number of years as a manager of UPS, in a strategic marketing and communications role. John holds an MSc in Transport Planning and Management from University of Westminster and is an Associate of King’s College London where he studied Classics and Theology. He is a Fellow of the UK Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport and former Chair of the Supply Chain and Logistics Global Advisory Council of the World Economic Forum.  He has also advised the European Commission Directorate-General for Energy and Transport. He has written three books on the industry – ‘Global Logistics Strategies: Delivering the Goods’, ‘Supply Chain Risk: Understanding Emerging Threats to Global Supply Chains’ and ‘Logistics and Supply Chains in Emerging Markets’. His second book, ‘Supply Chain Risk’ won the Mention Speciale ACA-Bruel Prize for supply chain literature in 2014.

David Buckby

Having obtained a Masters in Economics David is now Ti’s resident Economist. He manages one of Ti’s core strengths, that of quantitative analysis of a range of logistics markets, including sizing and forecasting. He has completed market sizing studies over a number of years on markets such as freight forwarding, contract logistics, European road freight transport, express and small parcels and e-commerce logistics. He also regularly updates Ti’s other quantitative tracking products - the Dashboard and Global Logistics Monitor. David also provides contributions to the GSCi portal, Ti reports and consultancy projects. He authors many briefs for Ti’s Logistics Briefing service, contributes articles to external publications and is regularly cited by industry media. His key interests are the economics of the logistics sector, emerging markets and statistical modelling.

New Ti report examines the dynamics of each logistics segment

 

  • The logistics industry has undergone a transformation in terms of the major logistics service providers which have come to dominate the market.
  • Ti’s new report examines the dynamics of each logistics segment that have caused the industry to transform.
  • For the first time this report includes Ti’s unique total logistics market sizing, segmentation by logistics market from top to bottom, and forecast growth to 2020.
  • Major developments, such as the ‘Internet of Things’, ‘autonomous vehicles’ and ‘3D printing’ are likely impact upon the logistics industry. This report assesses what could happen as a result of such innovations.

5th January 2017, Bath, UK: Ti is pleased to announce that its new report, Total Logistics 2017, is now available to purchase. This report offers a concise, easy to understand view of the industry. In addition, for the first time, Ti has sized the total logistics market and is offering a breakdown of the industry by logistics market, as well as forecasts to 2020.

Ti’s CEO, Professor John Manners-Bell explained, “The global logistics industry is vast, both in terms of market size and the huge numbers of people employed in the sector. It is therefore surprising that its role in the development of the global economy is generally overlooked.

Without the inexpensive and reliable transport of freight, manufacturers would not be able to tap into the cheap labour resources based in remote locations throughout the world. Nor would retailers be able to provide ever-increasing levels of service to their customers, ensuring shelves are always stocked whilst inventory is kept to a minimum.

This report will look at all the pressures which have led to the emergence of today’s vibrant global logistics industry – from both the ‘demand’ (i.e. manufacturing and retailing) and the ‘supply’ (i.e. logistics provider) side perspective. In addition to the roles of the contract logistics and freight forwarding sectors, it also examines the dynamics of the express parcels, container shipping, air cargo, road freight and intermodal industries. Whilst global macro-trends are highly important to the long term future of these sectors, conversely it is the structure and competitive nature of these sectors which has a ‘bottom up’ influence on supply chain management and hence global economies. For example, hyper-fragmentation and price competition in the European road freight industry has been a key input into the formulation of manufacturers’ and retailers’ centralised distribution strategies.

Manners-Bell continued, “What is clear is that after a turbulent period of transformation, there is no sign that change in the logistics industry is slowing down. A powerful mix of demand and supply side factors means that further re-structuring is possible, if not probable.

This report is perfect for

  • Global manufacturers
  • Banks and financial institutions
  • Supply chain managers and directors
  • Logistics procurement managers
  • Marketing managers
  • Knowledge managers
  • Investors
  • All C-level executives

 

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