Automotive Supply Chain and Logistics 2018

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About the Automotive Supply Chain & Logistics 2018 report

Automotive Supply Chain & Logistics 2018 offers a comprehensive view of the past, present and future of the automotive logistics sector.

With the introduction of electric vehicles and autonomous systems almost imminent, the impact on both supply chain management and logistics will be profound. However, there are many other significant issues affecting the industry, all of which are dealt with in Automotive Supply Chain and Logistics 2018.

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What are the major factors affecting the global automotive industry in 2018 and beyond?

  • Powertrains are evolving rapidly. For the first time in a century there are serious alternatives to the internal combustion engine.
  • Guidance is becoming automated, with ‘active cruise control’ and ‘collision avoidance’ systems being used as the basis for wider capabilities in semi-autonomous vehicles.
  • There is continued rapid expansion in emerging markets. If measured by numbers of cars sold, China is now the largest market.
  • The aftermarket appears to be maturing structurally in developed economies, whilst growth is explosive in emerging markets.
  • Automation is increasingly used at assembly plants, changing the design of line feed and consolidation operations.
  • The nature of assembly and production is being transformed by the demands of new technology. Automotive supply chains will come to more closely resemble those of the high tech sector, not least through globalized networks of supply.
  • Brexit and the renegotiation of NAFTA will provide additional challenges to the movement of automotive components in Europe and North America.

What impact will these factors have in the development of new supply chain strategies?

  • Supply chain geography is changing. Vehicle manufacturers now have a large proportion of their production capacity located in China, with other emerging markets (such as India) growing in importance.
  • The nature of product in the supply chain will change, as new types of engineering transform the economics of the sector. Supply chains will become more globalized for some components such as electronics, increasing pressure on air and sea freight operations and performance.
  • Challenges in distributing products to emerging markets will also place additional pressure on logistics providers.
  • Collision avoidance systems will ultimately reduce the amount of ‘crash’ spare parts needed and electric vehicles will have a fraction of the parts of a traditional engine impacting significantly on the aftermarket.

In addition to these fundamental issues, Automotive Supply Chain and Logistics 2018 provides in-depth profiles of the supply chain and logistics strategies of 12 major vehicle manufacturers, 15 leading automotive logistics service providers as well as market sizing and forecasting.

 

This report contains

  • In-depth analysis of the major factors affecting the global automotive industry in 2018 and beyond
  • Supply chain and logistics strategies of 12 vehicle manufacturers, including the top 10 by production
  • Profiles of 15 leading automotive logistics providers
  • Market sizes for 2015, 2016 and 2020
  • Global, regional and country-level figures
  • Growth rates for 2016 and CAGR forecasts to 2020
  • Segmentation by inbound, finished vehicle logistics and spare parts logistics.

This report contains

  • In-depth analysis of the major factors affecting the global automotive industry in 2018 and beyond
  • Supply chain and logistics strategies of 12 vehicle manufacturers, including the top 10 by production
  • Profiles of 15 leading automotive logistics providers
  • Market sizes for 2015, 2016 and 2020
  • Global, regional and country-level figures
  • Growth rates for 2016 and CAGR forecasts to 2020
  • Segmentation by inbound, finished vehicle logistics and spare parts logistics.

Exclusive highlights on the structure of the industry

  • Which carmakers are looking to outsource more?
  • Which manufacturers are globalising?
  • Which LSPs are growing their automotive business fastest?
  • How will key trends impact various logistics segments differently?

Market sizing and forecasts

  • Market sizes for 2015, 2016 and 2020
  • Global, regional and country-level figures
  • Growth rates for 2016 and CAGR forecasts to 2020
  • Segmentation by inbound, finished vehicle logistics and spare parts logistics.

1  Introduction 4

2  Key Trends in the Automotive
Supply Chain 7

2.1  Supply Chain Complexity 7

2.2  emerging markets 8

2.3  automating logistics Systems 9

2.4  trade 9

2.4.1 nafta 9

2.4.2 Brexit 11

2.5  order to delivery times 12

2.6  logistics costs 12

2.7  risk 13

2.8  Conclusion 14

3 Electric Propulsion & Electronic Guidance Technologies: The Impact
on Logistics & Supply Chain Management 15

3.1  Materials Alternatives to steel, use of carbon fibre and plastics and the new frame shops 15

3.2  Power-train Electronic propulsion, batteries and simplified assembly 16

3.3  Electronics Electronic guidance, long term removal of mechanical guidance and new components 16

3.4  Plug-in assembly Shrinking assembly facilities and contract manufacturing 16

4 Production Concepts and their Impact on Automotive Logistics 17

4.1  why logistics is important 17

4.2  production Concepts in automotive logistics 18

4.3  Supply Chain geography oF the automotive
Sector 18

4.4  location and Size of assembly plants 20

4.5  the impact of new production trends on transport demand 20

4.6  dealerships, retailing and logistics around
the world 21

4.7  different types of inbound logistics
operations 22

4.8  Finished vehicles 23 4.8.1 trucks 23 4.8.2 rail 23 4.8.3 Shipping 23 4.8.4 Storage 25

5 Component Suppliers’ Manufacturing and Logistics Operations 26

5.1 Suppliers manufacturing & Supply Chain profile 26 5.2 types of logistics operations 27 5.3 trends in Suppliers logistics 27

6 Spare Parts – The Automotive Aftermarket 28

6.1 the Structure of logistics in the aftermarket
and its prospects 29

6.2 types of logistics Service Bought 31

6.3 Summary: vms’ approach to aftermarket
logistics 31

7 Regional Assessments and Market Sizing 33

7.1 market Sizing methodology 33 7.2 global 34 7.3 asia 35

7.3.1 China 35 7.3.2 Japan 37 7.3.3 South korea 37 7.3.4 india 38 7.3.5 iran 39 7.3.6 indoneSia 39 7.3.7 thailand 39 7.3.8 myanmar 40

7.4 north america 40

7.4.1  united States 41

7.4.2  mexico 42

7.4.3  Canada 43

7.5 europe 43

7.5.1  uk 44

7.5.2  germany 45

7.5.3  France 46

7.5.4  italy 46

7.5.5  Spain 46

7.5.6  Central and eastern Europe 47

7.5.7  turkey 47

7.5.8  russia 47

7.6 South ameriCa 48 7.7 africa 48

8 Vehicle Manufacturers’ Logistics Strategies 50

8.1  Bmw 50

8.2  daimler (mercedes-Benz passenger cars) 53

8.3  Fiat Chrysler automobiles (fca) 56

8.4  Ford 59

8.5  general motors 63

8.6  honda 66

8.7  hyundai 69

8.8  Jaguar land rover 72

8.9  psa peugeot Citroen 74

8.10  renault-nissan 78

8.11  toyota 82

8.12  volkswagen 87

9 Automotive Logistics Providers 90

9.1  Big logistics 90

9.2  Ceva 95

9.3  DB Schenker logistics 98

9.4  deutsche post dhl group 100

9.5  dSv 102

9.6  gefco 104

9.7  groupe cat 106

9.8  kintetsu/apl logistics 107

9.9  kuehne + nagel 108

9.10  neovia 110

9.11  nyk/yusen logistics 110

9.12  penske logistics 112

9.13  ryder 113

9.14  xpo 115

9.15  Schnellecke 116

New Ti report says automotive logistics undergoing more change than at any time in the past 40 years

Ti’s latest report, Automotive Supply Chain and Logistics 2018, asserts that the automotive logistics sector is undergoing fundamental change as manufacturers and suppliers adjust to new technology.

The report investigates current and future automotive sector trends, sizes and forecasts automotive logistics markets, profiles 15 leading automotive logistics providers and analyses the supply chain and logistics strategies of 12 leading vehicle manufacturers.

Thomas Cullen, report co-author and senior analyst, stated: “Logistics in the automotive sector is undergoing more change than at any time in the past 40 years.

“There are two major drivers of this change. One is the growth of new markets, especially in China but in other regions as well. However, the greatest change is being wrought by new technology. The internal combustion engine is gradually being replaced by electrical power and electronic control systems. The implications for the automotive supply chain and the nature of vehicle production are huge and will be reflected in the changed nature of logistics. Not only will the sources of components be different but the nature of those components and the way they are moved about within any assembly plant will be profoundly unlike what has gone before.”

The report offers a comprehensive view of the past, present and future of the sector. It assesses how the sector has come to be, investigating issues such as how and why production strategies have evolved, supply chains have become more complex, logistics costs have changed, and emerging markets have become more important. This provides context for the trends shaping the future of the sector. The report analyses the implications for logistics and supply chains of electric car manufacturing, new digital guidance technology, changing manufacturing materials usage and much more.

Professor John Manners-Bell, Ti’s CEO and co-author, stated: “The automotive sector may become unrecognisable in time, driven by trends often referred to as Industry 4.0. These trends include the likely widespread adoption of electric vehicles, with all the attendant disruption this will have on engine production and spare parts logistics, to name just two key areas.

“In 5-10 years’ time, automotive supply chains are likely to look very different, although with the billions of dollars already invested in existing plants and production processes, change may be slower than many believe.”

There are numerous concrete examples of how supply chains will be forced to adjust. For example, all-electric propulsion will see the requirement for an engine plant disappear, with logistics focus shifting to the management of battery production and the movement of batteries to assembly plants. Changing materials use will change the nature of the ‘frame shop’, the feeding of steel coil will reduce or disappear and carbon fibre fabrication facilities will be created feeding assemblies into the primary plant. New digital guidance technology could see a significant part of assembly operations become similar to that of IT hardware such as PCs or mobile phones. Overall, there will be a dramatic fall in the level of assembly activity needed inside vehicle manufacturing plants, and this will have an enormous impact on logistics and supply chain management.

Cullen concluded: “Many LSPs face the need to rethink their business models. Not only will they have to deal with issues such as the changed pattern of globalisation, they will have to adapt to new operational activity by vehicle manufacturers and component suppliers. For example, the traditional road freight ‘milk run’ is increasingly old-fashioned and the road freight providers who specialise in it will already be under pressure. It might be suggested that large LSPs who specialise in ‘Transport Management Services’ can adapt in such an environment, however this is also questionable as the attraction of new web-based ‘freight exchanges’ is only likely to increase especially if there is greater use of intercontinental air and sea freight.”

To download Ti’s new report, or for further information on the report, click here.

 

 

For any enquiries, please contact Ti’s Business Development Manager, Michael Clover +44 (0) 1666 519900 mclover@ti-insight.com

Source: Transport Intelligence, February 13, 2018

Author: Transport Intelligence

 

  Prof John Manners-Bell is Chief Executive of Ti, Honorary Visiting Professor at the London Metropolitan University’s Guildhall Faculty of Business and Law and an adviser to the World Economic Forum. He has over 25 years’ experience working in and analysing the global logistics sector.
     
  Thomas Cullen / Senior Analyst
Thomas is a widely respected writer and has been analyzing the global logistics market for over 15 years. He has edited a number of international publications and written for most of the leading trade publications in Europe. He has written several in-depth reports on a variety of subjects including Automotive and Chemical logistics. Thomas has been vital in adding value to Ti's Logistics Briefing service for the last 10 years and works on many global consultancy projects.
     
 
David Buckby

Having obtained a Masters in Economics David is now Ti’s resident Economist. David manages one of Ti’s core strengths, that of quantitative analysis of a range of logistics markets, including sizing and forecasting. David contributes to the GSCi portal, Ti Reports and consultancy projects.

   
 

This report is perfect for

  • Global manufacturers
  • Banks and financial institutions
  • Supply chain managers and directors
  • Logistics procurement managers
  • Marketing managers
  • Knowledge managers
  • Investors
  • All C-level executives

 

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